Alpha Rho Bro. Randall Woodfin (SPR 2002) Closes In On $1Mil Campaign Goal -- $30K Rally Underway


With the virtual launch of his re-election campaign just 2 days away, Brother Randall Woodfin is focused on closing in on his historic fundraising kick-off goal of $1million dollars! At the moment, he's just shy of $30,000 from hitting the mark and an all out fundraising rally is now underway to meet the campaign goal before the 12 Noon, Saturday, January 30th virtual launch.


As we activated during his original 2016 campaign for the office of Mayor of Birmingham, Alabama, Alpha Rho Brothers are now in a clutch position to drive our Brother over the top, once again! Remember -- this ChAPterly appeal has a 2-day window in order for the campaign to launch with an announcement of a $1 million re-election campaign war chest, so if you're able, please act today.


“From fairly early in my youth, I had been committed to the idea that I wanted to serve Birmingham in the most meaningful way possible. I wanted to bring people and businesses and organizations across our city together to make Birmingham the very best it can be — a place where every citizen has opportunities to develop their potential to its fullest. I wanted to be responsible for charting Birmingham’s course into a future of innovation and progress, while beginning to achieve at last the goals of equality and inclusion that are ingrained in our civic character. I wanted to be Mayor.”


-- The Honorable Randall Lee Woodfin, Mayor of Birmingham, Alabama

From the campaign: We're grateful to have you as part of our grassroots movement to ensure Randall Woodfin is re-elected in 2021. If you can, please make a donation to Randall's re-election campaign today to help him continue fighting for our progressive agenda. He cannot win this race alone.

Click the link below to DONATE:


https://secure.actblue.com/donate/woodfin2021


I was born in Birmingham. And, with the exception of four years in Atlanta, earning my degree from Morehouse College, I have lived in Birmingham all my life.


When I say I grew up in Birmingham, I mean that I grew up all over Birmingham. My mother and my father both came from large families, so we were always visiting grandparents and aunts and uncles and cousins, as they visited our home in North Birmingham. I had relatives in Kingston, Collegeville, West End, Southtown, Loveman’s Village, Fountain Heights, Metropolitan Gardens, Pratt City, Mason City — like I said, all over town.


My parents divorced when I was eight. Three years later, after my mother remarried, my brother and sisters and I moved with her to Crestwood, adding another neighborhood and its surrounding communities to my regular experience of the city I lived in.

That experience was also multi-generational. From the time I was born until I finished high school, I never lived in a house that had fewer than eight residents. My great-grandmother, who died at the age of 100, lived with us for the last nine years of her life, so we often had members of four generations living together. It would be impossible for me to overstate the value of that experience and its impact on my perspective and my beliefs.

Seeing as much of Birmingham as I did growing up gave me a deep sense of connection to the city and kinship with my fellow citizens. Being from Birmingham became, and remains, an integral part of who I am.


Even when I left for college, I knew that I would come home to live. After graduating from Morehouse — and serving as SGA President during my senior year — I came back to Birmingham and worked at City Hall (in jobs for both the Mayor and the City Council) and for the Jefferson County Committee on Economic Opportunity (JCCEO), getting a feel for the way our public sector works (and doesn’t). I attended Cumberland School of Law at Samford University and, after obtaining my law degree, accepted a job in the City of Birmingham Law Department.

As an assistant city attorney, it inspired me to think of Birmingham as my client. But I also began to think of politics and government as the most direct and impactful avenue to addressing the city’s needs and positioning it to take more and better advantage of opportunities. I became an organizer, working on campaigns on the local, state and federal levels. In 2009, I ran for a seat on the Birmingham Board of Education and lost. I ran again in 2013, and won.


From fairly early in my youth, I had been committed to the idea that I wanted to serve Birmingham in the most meaningful way possible. I wanted to bring people and businesses and organizations across our city together to make Birmingham the very best it can be — a place where every citizen has opportunities to develop their potential to its fullest. I wanted to be responsible for charting Birmingham’s course into a future of innovation and progress, while beginning to achieve at last the goals of equality and inclusion that are ingrained in our civic character.

I wanted to be Mayor.


So, I ran for Mayor. Starting in the summer of 2016 — a full year before the election — I knocked on 50,000 doors across the city. Nearly every day for a year, plus six more weeks when the election went to a runoff, I spent time not just talking about what I hoped to accomplish as Mayor, but even more, listening to people talk. They talked about their jobs, their families, their neighborhoods, their churches. Some talked about their hopes and dreams for Birmingham, about the kind of city they wanted to live in, and what role they expected City Hall to play in making that happen.


But more than anything else, people talked about the city’s responsibility for delivering essential services. Picking up trash, cutting empty lots, demolishing dilapidated structures, maintenance and repair of everything from streets and sidewalks to parks — services that, in addition to their importance in the daily lives of people and businesses, are critical components of neighborhood revitalization and enhancement.


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